Room to Grow

by / Comments Off on Room to Grow / 122 View / February 24, 2017

Story by Brittany Sailors, Photos by GB Staff

Having children in today’s age is akin to navigating a china shop with a blindfold on. Gingerly marching forward, arms outstretched, praying you don’t cause any permanent damage. We want what’s best for our kids and we feel the ever-present parental guilt when we can’t provide them with the best clothing, schooling, nutrition, etc.

Whitney Sokol, Boise mother and founder of SproutFit childrenswear, aims to change the way you invest in your child’s wardrobe, allowing your purchase to have a positive environmental and socio-economic impact. This January, I sat down with Whitney to discuss her inspiration for founding SproutFit and learn more about her product.    

After her first child turned one, Whitney began compiling for donation those items he no longer fit into. Upon finishing the monstrous task of organizing by size and type, she realized the absurdity of the sheer mass of clothing articles her small son had acquired in his single year of life – six 30-gallon containers full! Some items had never even been worn, as they were too quickly outgrown or ill-fitting on his slender frame.

You don’t need me to enumerate the reasons why the globalization of the clothing manufacturing industry has resulted in harmful processes for the environment and further propagated unethical labor practices. Most of us are aware there are negative effects of mass globalization of commodities. We’re also aware of the benefits; a lower price point and the convenience of purchasing at the nearest big-box store. All too often we allow these two factors to determine what and where we buy, while ignoring the silent impact.

Out of her astonishment at the incredible waste occurring in her own home, Whitney began brainstorming to find a better way to clothe babies and toddlers. As a mother, she felt overwhelmed by the variation in children’s clothing. First and foremost, she was tired of the sizing chart almost every manufacturer followed, seven sizes in the first two years. She knew first hand that babies grow rapidly during this time. Still, she felt there was a better way. Out of her frustration, grew SproutFit, an adjustable childrenswear line designed to stretch and adapt to your growing baby throughout their first two years.

Equivalent to her desire to provide a better fitting wardrobe was her insistence upon ethical practices throughout the manufacturing process. Her line would be made in the USA from renewable resources and the carbon footprint of production kept to a minimum. Whitney spoke affectionately about the number one motivating factor behind the SproutFit line, her own son.

“As a mom, I’m always looking for ways to protect my child and his future, and that begins with choosing clothes that are sustainable in both design and material.”

SproutFit is using Kickstarter to support the launch of its childrenswear line, with pledges accepted February 24th – March 26th. Parents rejoice! No more rummaging through the drawers looking for the right size bodysuit. Whitney shared with me the capsule wardrobe concept and how SproutFit’s line simplified parent’s lives.

“When you ask people what they want more of, time and money are two of the most common answers.  Building a capsule wardrobe for babies represents just that! A capsule wardrobe is a collection of a few essential items of clothing that typically don’t go out of fashion, but can be augmented with seasonal pieces. We want to solve problems, not create more. With more time to worry about the important things and less money spent on clothing that will be discarded quickly.”

SproutFit has the solution to the children’s clothing debacle; simple, sustainable, sensible childrenswear.

SproutFit • sproutfit.co